More mouth saliva, bad breath

Bit of a strange one but has anyone else ended up with more mouth saliva ( dribbling) and bad breath since their stroke?
Prior to the stroke I’d been a smoker for about 30 years but never a heavy smoker. I now vape but a couple of times a day.
But my wife and daughters have noticed my breath is awful. Since the stroke I tend to mouth breathe a lot more, especially at night.
I also mouth dribble at times.
Is this a common and permanent result of the stroke?
I do brush my teeth twice a day and mouth wash twice a day as well if anyone was wondering :wink::smile:

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I haven’t any real suggestions for this but wonder if it is something a speech & language therapist could help with. Despite their job title they don’t just deal with speech & language. You may just need a few exercises to retrain your mouth so you don’t dribble. You could try practising some breathing exercises to make sure you breath through your nose when you’re meant to. If it is stroke related theres hope it wont be permanent.

Is it diet related or do you suffer from reflux? Could both be causes.

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Dunno about the bad breath but there are loads (29!) of posts here about excess saliva (just use the magnifying glass to search

:slight_smile:

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Thank you Simon :+1:
My wife has actually just said to me " you didn’t really admit on my stroke guide forum, that you’ve got bad breath?"
:smile:

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Dunno why anyone would say you shouldn’t say you’ve bad breath when searching for answersv! :slight_smile:

Dentist may be able to advise and or ENT specialist?

Caio
Simon

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:joy: Is it causing anyone else any alarm? I mingle with many non-stroke brains who have terrible breath. I’m not sure of my own, only your wife may tell you otherwise, I guess drink and gargle more water to dispel scents in the mouth. You could try chewing gum or scented mints. It could be a gum problem, so the answer might be getting somer gum wash like Corsodyl, or if you want to go natural, grow some mint and chew on that. :grinning:

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I’ve been looking into dry mouth gel. I was kind of hoping my wife would say it’s ok, start smoking again. Not happened and not going to :wink:
I’ve been using corsydyl mouthwash for a while now

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The drooling I’m familiar with as a post stroke symptom. Thats eased up a lot, though not completely, over the years for me.

The bad breath issue you have should really be checked out by your gp and dentist though. The medications we are all on can cause things like stomach digestive issues, the meds being too harsh for the stomach lining, and you may just require something like Omeprozol to protest that lining.

Some antibiotics can also cause temporary bad breath.

You say you clean your teeth regularly but do you clean your tongue? That can fur up throughout particularly from dairy produce, such as milk in tea/coffee, cream and cheese. So after brushing your teeth, brush your tongue as well :wink: Look up halitosis.

The medications also have an effect on liver/kidney function which may be the cause of such symptoms. Personally, my gp would be my first port of call to rule out any potential medical issue first.

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Thank you for that. I take lansoprazole to counter all the tablets I take, but perhaps I need something else.
I’m a strange one me, cos I don’t drink milk, never have. I can’t stand it. But I’ve never thought about a tongue cleaner before. Think it’s time to get one.
:+1:

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Hi @stokiejoey
I assume you know about glutamate? If not a quick search will reveal much

“I asked the neurosurgeon why patients with traumatic brain injury tend to have a specific smell on their breath regardless of bathing, oral care etc. He was able to explain that the smell is due to glutamate that is released by the death of brain cells. There is not anything that can be done to remove the smell.”

Good luck, Roland

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Never heard of that but thank you Roland.
:+1:

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You don’t need to waste money getting anything special to clean your tongue, just use your toothbrush. Its all I ever use and works a treat :blush:

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A number of the manual toothbrushes have a slightly rough bit on the bottom to help with the tongue.

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Oh wow!!
After 3 1/2 years of stroke experiences and a reasonably wide ranging reading habit yours Roland is the first reference I have seen to glutamate and yet it is so central as explained here.

You’ve just expanded my horizons and given me a whole new area to explore. I’m already wondering what affect the processing cycle’s disruption has on things like fatigue, memory…

Thanx :slight_smile: :heart:

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Never suffered from a dry mouth before stroke , but after stroke bad taste in mouth and dry at night, thought it was teeth or gums, no was told it was my medication. Dribbling stopped after first year but flem at times an issue. Have learnt to breath through nose at night, took me a couple of years which improved dry mouth. But my sense of smell been well and truly altered as was my mothers when stroked. When It’s good, can locate perfume from flowers and ladies from a distance but unfortunately bad breath and drains and other nasties. Comes and goes.
Well thats stroke for you. Paul

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Dribbling most certainly regular wet collar, and wet patch on my guitar!embarasing when out. 9 months on and not really any better.
hey Ho!

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