Thought this would never happen!

My exciting news - 40 very wobbly steps with no stick!!! I thought it would never happen but wont be trying it outside just yet!!!

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Wobble on friend.

. . . and congratulations!

:grin: :+1:

just watch out for the speed cameras

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:rofl::rofl:. Thanks Bobbi! Musnt get over confident!

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Wow…and no sticks :smile: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :partying_face:
That’s just got to be celebrated and now you’ve started hopefully it will start to speed up quickly . . . and before you know it, you’ll be entering to London marathon :laughing: Well done, keep it going.

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A Marathon! The 40 wobbly steps felf like a marathon! Thanks Emerald

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Well done you :clap:

Such a good feeling when you achieve something so difficult. Keep on keeping on

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@Apple that’s amazing. A massive well done to you. There’ll be no stopping you soon. So pleased for you xx

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Thanks Ann. I honestly thought I would never walk without a stick. Certainly won’t be walking outside minus a stick for a while!

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One stage at a time. Master inside first then when you’ve built your confidence outside will come. Took me ages to build the confidence to go outside but got there in the end. Still take a support though (usually the golf umbrella :umbrella: ).

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Congratulations! This is such wonderful news! Reward yourself, now. Just because it feels good and will remind you how far you have come when you forget a month or two from now, because you are on to wobbling down the road to the beat of “Another One Bites the Dust”. I think I will treat myself to M&M topped Cherry Cordial Ice Cream in your honor. Shall I have some for you as well?

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I’ve been trying to do this for 2 years, how long did it take you? I just want to encourage myself to keep trying, though I can only do about 100 metres, with a quad stick, indoors.

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@Jfitz
You make the effort and you will reap the rewards.

Keep coming back to this thread and posting your victories. It will be a record of your progress.

Beware of that word ‘only’ it is only one step at a time that will get you to where you are going. Each step is a massive achievement.

Be patient and kind to yourself, you are worth it. Come back and make lots of noise here, we want to congratulate you and urge you onward.

If things turn out sour we have sympathy and listening ears too, but for now celebrate your success.
:partying_face:

Keep on keepin’ on
:grin: :+1:

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Thanks Bobbi. That seems to be one of the mottoes of this site - “keep on keeping on” ! very appropriate :smirk:

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Hi Jfitz. I’m 7 months post stroke and honestly thought I would never walk without a stick. Suddenly thought yesterday I will try and although I’m very unstable and definitely wouldn’t attempt it outside it was quite easy! Am prepared for setbacks but am very lucky in that my husband has been amazing and I also still have a great NHS physio once a week

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DeAnn. They sound delicious- could you post me one please!

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To both @Apple and @Jfitz the trouble with walking sticks is they are both a blessing and a curse because of the muscular effects they will have on your posture. So the walking sticks will be throwing your balance off regardless of what they do for you.

Cause and effect
image

Don’t know if either of you ever saw a medical drama called House, played by Hugh Laurie as an American doctor who had a limp due to an infarction of his quadriceps muscle and walked with a stick. Since those days, whenever he hears the word “action” when filming anything else, he instinctively starts limping.
But also, pretending to have a limp has caused him real injury in that it’s given him knee issues as a limp requires a lot of hip work as well as shoulder strain. He did try to relieve the issue somewhat by switching the cane from hand to hand whilst filming onset…and the series ran for 8 seasons.

For stroke survivors it is a true case of mind over matter, our walking issues are of the mind as not a physical injury to the leg itself. Hence the necessity to throw off the use of any walking aids as quick as you can after a stroke. Because the longer you leave it the more naturally dependent you become of them, you’ll retrain your brain, wrongly, into believing it can’t walk without them. Also cause you any number of painful shoulder, arm, hip and knee issues.

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Congratulations,I’m new here but already finding just reading others little victories is just so heartening.So thank you for sharing and I hope you keep improving

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Hello Justin. This is a great group and packed with information. As I was so convinced I would never walk without a stick I’m amazed when I found I could! Good luck with your recovery- it just seems so slow at times doesn’t it?

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I agree with you on this, and have experienced it as well. I will say one must decide which risks are bigger problems before giving them up. I have a 4 post walker, rolling walker, cane. I am able to walk without them, however, I cannot see well enough for walking so after falling many times and causing further damages I am still using them outside of home depending on whether someone is with me or how dizzy I am feeling at the time. Mostly use the 4 legged or a shopping cart. I was bending over that thing like I have osteoporosis, have to remind my brain I can stand up straight, but that is hard to do while I am reminding my brain to take steps, trying to deal with movement around me, noise, and remember the steps to where I am going. Two odd but happy occurrences, my brain remembers how to walk correctly in heels, and typing posture. I don’t care about the heels, but my brain remembers a different center of balance. It doesn’t recognize these new flat shoes I bought so I wouldn’t trip. The typing posture certainly helps with neck and back pain. It only remembered, though, after I recently purchased a real keyboard instead of trying to type on the laptop.

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Oh no, I’m not saying they should just lay down their stick and walk no matter the risks.

It’s just that the brain has now formed this new bad habit, of only being able to walk with sticks. The body now carries and holds itself to a different posture and gait compared to pre stroke days and that’s all going to have to be reversed. Hence the meaning behind the term of mind over matter, you have to break out of these new habits learnt. And the only way to do that is to do lots of walking around without the sticks in order to break those habits.

Plenty of chair based exercises to strengthen the legs will help reduce the nervous wobbly legs and boost your confidence in walking. A good one to help you feel more grounded and steadier on your legs is to wear ankle weights as you do laps around the house…it’s an exercise to strengthening the legs at the same time :wink: I know a few women at my strength & balance class who use ankle weights to walk laps around the hall, they don’t even carry their walking sticks with them while they do it. And one lady also uses wrist weights particularly for her stroke arm.

And if you can get yourself to any sort of fitness classes for your age group and ability, that certainly boosts your confidence tenfold. Being part of a group with similar issues helps break down those barriers you build around you post stroke.

You may never be 100% steady but you’ll form new tricks to counter that. For instances, 2 years on I still have some balance issues. So at the gym, when doing free floor exercises, I’ll keep a wall to my back for any bending at the waist stretches, or I’ll hold a weights bar like a staff to do knee bends…at home I’d use the sweeping brush. I’ll never walk around with both hands full, I always like to keep one hand free and clear. I also never keep my hands in my pockets, particularly walking around outside. Swinging the arms when walking also help keep your balance.

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