Neuropathy

I was wondering if anyone has had their neuropathy go away after a stroke? It’s been 5 months since this started.

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I would love to tell you “Yes, It has gone away.” But for me, it has not. In fact, it has gotten a bit worse. However, I have become somewhat used to it. It has become almost normal to me. Bothers me most when I try to sleep at night. I wish there were a pain reliever that worked or even better a cure, but if there is, it is unknown to me.

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Oh, thank you much! I sure hope it goes away eventually. How long has it been for you? Sad :frowning: it hasn’t gone away for you!

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I am just over two years. Unfortunately it seems exacerbated by using the affected side of my body, but the consequences of not using them is much worse than the tingling, burning, freezing, stiff, numbness or tremoring are.

I am reading up on Neuroscience which has recently had better information for me than stroke guides. Right now I am looking at the information recently posted regarding weather and neuropathy, as someone had mentioned it here, then soon after I received my free copy of Brain and Life magazine from the American Academy of Neurology that had an article about it. There is also one regarding alcohol and neurology, and another about vision.

Stroke is mentioned in all of them. I get a free online version via email as well but prefer the paper copy. I like their website for further information.

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Oh, I see what you mean about n the problems if not used affected parts. That magazine does sound interesting! I heard of some medication that can be used if painful. It did not bother me much at first visit with my neurological nurse but I’m going to make another appointment to find out more about the medication.
As to you! And thank you you have been very hopeful with your information!

:slightly_smiling_face::slightly_smiling_face:

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Hi DeAnn,
Do you know anything about that brain fog I hear about. Did you have a brain fog after your stroke and did it finally go away eventually?

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I still have the brain fog, but recently it has slowed down quite a bit. It depends largely on how much rest I have had, how much activity and what kind, sometimes the weather, and when or if I remembered to take my medicines. I am very happy to say it seems to be lessening. I do push myself beyond my limits with little success and worsening fogginess, until I give up and go to bed. Most days I can stay up 16-18 hours, but if I push too hard, I must sleep awhile. 2 hours of basketball in person, with 90 kid players, plus their parents, grandparents, siblings, in a gymnasium, with tennis shoes squeaking on the floor, balls bouncing, talking, people moving all about, and loud buzzers…pure torture, but I made it through, then came home and laid in bed for hours afterwards. Rest when you need to but push yourself to do what is important to you as well.

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Thanks so much, it’s good to hear it’s kind of getting better but depends on your circumstances. I don’t know how you could do that with all those little ones running around, You’re an inspiration! We have our grandkids over every Saturday night. But when they start getting rowdy when they hang out too long together with each other, which pushes me to my limit and sometimes have to go to the upper room and just watch TV. I am pretty scheduled as far as my sleep I go to bed and get up at the exact same time every day whether I sleep good or not. And I really don’t want to take naps cuz it might give me in a cycle of not sleeping every night. But I may have to test maps and see if it helps my fogginess. It has pretty much been the same everyday for going on 7 months now. But it does get worse if I’m too tired of push my limit also. I try to stay active every day doing something. Yesterday I started a stationary bike but only for 5 minutes and will add 5 minutes as I stand in my builds up. Have a fruit smoothie every morning at 10:00 And then I will start doing the bike everyday. Does seem to make the rest of my day a little bit harder but maybe I will get used to it! Thanks much for the reply.
I wish the best for your journey through this new world!:slightly_smiling_face:
Mike

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I meant to ask you is there medication you can take for that fogginess I go back to see my neurologist April of next year as soon as I could get in!
Thanks again :slightly_smiling_face:

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The fog lifted about a year or so after my stroke, so there’s still time for that to right itself for you :smile: And then there are others on here who still suffer occasionally years later. It just goes to show how individual strokes are.

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I had awful foggy heads for many months after my stroke. I still get it 2 year’s on but not as often and generally if i have done too much.

Hopefully yours will ease in time.

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Thank you emeraldeyes that gives me some encouragement at least I know it lifts a little bit. It can’t come soon enough for me. A year seems to be such a long time but st least it’s not a lifetime! :yum:
The best to you and your recovery! Thanks again for the words of encouragement on your story!

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Thank you that is good to know that it does lift a way eventually even if it comes back is okay better than a whole lifetime!
I hope things are going okay for your recovery! It seems to just be a long process that needs lots of patience in the right thinking to keep positive!
Mike

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Oh yes stroke recovery definitely requires much patience. I thought i’d be back to normal in a few weeks when I had my stroke but 2 years on i’m not there yet. It does all improve in time though just not as fast as we’d like.

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Well you’re already over half way there then aren’t, as you said above it’s “been the same every day for going on 7 months now” :crossed_fingers: :smile:

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@Mrs5K seems to be right where I am. I am just over 2 years in. Being overactive seems to bring it on however I still push it and it seems to lessen a bit as I get used to whatever activity. I do take gabapentin for my eyesight, in hopes it would stop or lessen the Oscillopsia and Nastygmas. I am dizzy and a bit out of sorts with it, and without it. It doesn’t help with pain much, but I can’t decide if I am better with or without it. I have good hours, and rough hours. The basketball game had me out of it for a couple of days, but usual activities might cause an hour or two of foggy brain…such as paying the bills, which I only do once a month, or doing dishes (remember many people are here so it is many dishes). Folding clothes only bothers me a little. It is the movement that seems to cause the fogginess, I think maybe it is from concentrating on more than one thing at a time. I refuse to sit in a chair the rest of my life, or not be able to walk and talk at the same time, so I keep pushing a little further all the time.

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I’ve never heard of anyone taking gabapentin for eyesight. Not that I need it but I am intrigued by that.

I’m with you on the dizziness but not sure what is causing mine. I’m still waiting to see someone about it. I have a similar fatigue experience too. Going out wears me out but I still go with it sometimes in the hope it will eventually lessen my symptoms. I remain hopeful :grin:

And who would have thought that walking & talking at same time would be so difficult :rofl: xx

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Hi @Mikedob

I’m catching up on topics that I missed from mid October to November - so sorry this is bumping an old thread…

I wondered What type of neuropathy you are suffering from? Whether it was peripheral or central?

I guess you’ve done some reading up?

There are certainly topics here with posts on both themes - and there’s stuff on the net about more or less useful techniques to reduce it - magnifying icon above is a useful resource. And highlighting a word or phrase and then searching the web is handy I find :slight_smile:

Peripheral neuropathy has been linked as a uncommon side effect of statins . (?)

There are some posts in the central post stroke pain topic here about using de-sensitisation techniques.
in my ignorant non-medical and damaged recall neuropathy can because by the brain filling a void of signal and so things like feeling lots of different textures may over time help - I’m sure I’ve read a therapy that uses it but I can’t think of the name. There is loads of stuff on the net about sensory processing and sensory/tactile defensiveness

There’s also quite a lot on here about keeping a diary of hydration activity and fog and then looking for patterns

Ciao
Simon

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