Neuropathy

I’m two and a half years years post stroke.
In the last two weeks I’ve noticed the onset with increasing amounts of neuropathy in my right hand.

Has anyone else seen increase rather than decrease (I don’t know whether it’s neurological or physical) .
any thoughts besides seeing the GP which I have very little faith in anything in has anything other than a pill pusher about what to do for relief .
The tingling and numbness isn’t severe and it’s not continuous . it’s intermittent and if a indication of something starting I’d rather nip it in the bud. There are medications associated with it which I will explore with the GP but anybody’s experience that they could share could be helpful
Thanks

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Simon,

hi there, please remind me
What 's the current statuts of your right hand and arm ? are they active ?

My right/stroke hand and arm were remapped 10 days after my stroke, thanks to my Chinese Dr. That gave me full mobility of my right arm hand and fingers so I’m likely a one-off case in these parts of the world

speak soon, Roland

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Simon, it could just be carpal tunnel syndrome, it affects the thumb, index finger and down the inside of the middle finger (side next to index finger). I have it in my left hand, occasionally in the right but had it long before my stroke.

@Loshy can tell you more about it as she’s had the op for it, I’m going to give a couple more years yet as it’s no worse post stroke so I can live with it.

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@SimonInEdinburgh i sometimes get tingling in my hands & feet. Not always affected side. I think its peripheral neuropathy but never discussed with my gp. I do have another condition which this is a symptom of & i’m being monitored for that so not in a rush to see GP.

I can’t help with any meds or anything but do you have access to your stroke team still? Could be worth a call to them.

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I read an article from Flint Rehab I wanted to share but could not find it again, regarding the tingling /burning/cold/numbness and spasticity, that mentioned sometimes it is a sign of healing. I have no idea how they came to that conclusion, nor how to know if it is healing or something new, but I am hoping that is why mine seems worse. I am much more active lately.

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I actually came across this earlier whilst looking up tingling for another reason, is that the one you refer to?

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that’s the one.

How are you so good at that? I used to do much research online, but my mind goes in circles these days. Not terrible, just no longer really good at it.

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I used to do a lot too, mainly for other family members. It’s taken me the best part of 2yrs to get it back, so that’s an improvement I’ve really only gained since I joined the forum in January. My mind is finally starting to stop spinning :smile:

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@Loshy No not so far. I noticed it most when I’m trying to use my arm or when it’s just hanging limply which it chooses to do if I don’t consciously think about it.

@pando I haven’t got to your exalted heights I think the arms pretty mobile I can put it out straight at the shoulder and only kinked at the elbow both in front and to the side of me get it part way up my back to the back of my neck. The index and little finger will move on demand the middle too won’t. I can make a loose fist I’m not yet at the point of doing buttons or tying a bow and as little dexterity and this a great deal of conscious effort needed to make what should be autonomic movements like grasping something stop I don’t know what remapping is. I also have my stroke during covid and got virtually no physio four sessions of about 45 minutes aimed getting me to be able to walk from bed to toilet and when that was achieved I was out which was probably a relief because I was more than anxious about catching covid in a busy hospital ward .

@EmeraldEyes well that’s a thought I didn’t considered carpal tunnel syndrome I think it’s coming from the c2 or 3 if that’s a correct designation vertebrae in my spine because I have a degree of pain down the back of my arm all the way around a little finger and I can exacerbate that by the way I move my neck but I had that for a year without any tingling or numbness so this is definitely a development

@Mrs5K I couldn’t say I ever had a stroke team!
I haven’t liaison nurse who’s currently off long-term sick so no not really just the GP which as I said in another post the surgery is being subsumed into a mega surgery and so you now have no continuity the only long serving GP is absolutely swamped by all the people who try and book him because he’s The only one who has been there 20 years rather than 20 minutes

@DeAnn seems that emerald eyes has found it for us. I hope you’re right that it’s a sign of things getting better :slight_smile:
The jury’s out for me on whether flint rehab devices are worth investing in but yeah I have found they write some good stuff so I’ll ever read
Just sitting here dictation this and I’ve got some tingling in the little finger
I am trying to use my arm all the time so maybe it’s just after the awakening process

Thanks everyone for sharing :slight_smile:

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Simon,

This is my take. My guess is that the muscles in your hand are trying to connect to the brain. It’s a painfully slow process, but a good one. New nerves may be actively bridging the gap between peripheral (spine) system, and full control, to the brain. Tingling is an awakening, while new nerve cells, and neurogenesis takes place. There will be many suggestions mostly experimental… I have the same problem in my foot… and vibrations, I think, help calm my paraesthesia, rather than aggravate it.

There will be many varied suggestions coming your way. I don’t think anyone knows how the brain recovers… we’re all unique. Anyway, good luck, and let us know how progress goes, or if you find a breakthrough…

Best wishes, ciao, Roland

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Hi @pando
That’s a very positive note and I hope you’re right.
I noticed how little the medical profession ever refers to neurogenesis. I also noticed that they never refer to any brain networks like the salience or central executive. Personally I can’t see the point of talking about damage to a physical area without also then referencing which networks work through it. It’s like saying there’s a broken cable in the car without saying that its affecting the braking or the lighting system .

Neurogenesis of hand function would be very welcome because my middle two fingers don’t respond at all to being thought at whereas the external two Ie index and pinky I can think at them and even if I can’t see them move I can know that they are connected but the middle to just don’t seem to be connected
What perturbs me is I have seen progress without having pins and needles so I don’t correlate the arrival of pins and needles with anything identifiable
Ciao

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So not carpal tunnel then as it doesn’t affect the little finger at all.
C2 or 3 is top end of neck, so basically you recon its coming from the back of neck region.
I know what you probably need though, a darn good massage from the likes of a sports physiotherapist for some massage and manipulation. Or an osteopath if you know of a good one.

If you can’t afford that get yourself a massage hook, wouldn’t be without mine. They’re great for reaching around the back where your hands won’t go and you can really dig into the spots of tension where needed.
image
There will be a lot of tension built up in your back from your stroke. Tension knots up and strangles the nerves exacerbating the problem, hence the sensations like tingling.


Here’s something to try, nothing ventured, nothing gained.
Feel around that meaty bit of muscle at the side of your neck where neck meats shoulder. Feel around for a tender bruised spot (green spot on image), gently squeeze and massage the area for 30secs. Find the centre of the area and dig your finger in as hard as you can for 30secs then gently squeeze and massage again. Repeat the process a few times, then put some heat on it and let it rest. It’s takes a few days (3or4) to feel any benefit, but it might just be enough to release your finger. Or you may need to repeat the process again. But that’s why I suggest you could use a sports physiotherapist at this point as their will be trigger spots that need working on in order to release the tension hence freeing the nerves.

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Well I found it on Amazon for 19 quid and the massage bit is ironic because my son runs a sports massage business but in Dubai rather than in Scotland.
Thanks for the suggestion though. you’re probably right that it would help. I do have a hard not exactly prickly but noblley ball in a thick winter sock that I can roll around between the wall and my back when I have a very tight knots which I do quite often.
Ciao :slight_smile:

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Like you, Simon, I want to know which bit is connected. Where is the short in the wiring? I have found I ‘need’ to know the whys and hows even more now. Sometimes, I think, we are just going to have to do our own experimenting or trust the people telling us to try this or that, hoping they have experience, even if they aren’t giving us the science to back it up.

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At the gym today I noticed a few clicks in my left shoulder and some funny twinge under the right shoulder blade which explains my click right ring finger. So tonight I’ve been giving my back a good workover with the hook. I’ve found some seriously sore spots I’ve really dug into, so now I’m going to take a couple paracetamol and finish off with an icepack on them.

image

It’s called listening to your own body @DeAnn :smile: Tracking back to the source, you’re becoming your own medical detective :male_detective:

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you may just have explained to my why a heated blanket on my left (numb/tingling) side feels so good. I often wear a fleece lined sock on my left foot, nothing on the right looking like a dork, but I only do it here at home. The kids do it, too, so maybe its a cool new fad. they also wear their shirts inside out and pants backwards. I don’t know what they are about, but they don’t judge me, so I won’t judge them.

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You can also use a combination of heat and ice for muscular injury or relax muscle tension. 5mins heat, 5 mins ice, and repeat for 3 cycles but always finish off with heat. Good for making the blood circulate a bit quicker around the area.

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What does it say about Sensation

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I have been having whole lot of health issues

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Just discovered this un sent

Sure inside out seems like a natural hazard post stroke. it’s a “oh blast! look how well I’ve done getting dressed, oh well I’m not going to change it cos its too hard.” But pants backwards ? no that just seems uncomfortable that would actually have to be changed .
I definitely think being one’s own therapist and integrator is necessary. I haven’t had many therapists . None that have impressed me with showing much understanding in a visceral sense. In fact I haven’t met one yet who can use common language and doesn’t rely on Latin muscle names and easoteric vocabulary etc eg 'subduction’/ flexion etc as language to alienate and a barrier. I also don’t think an hour a month or in some cases an hour a quarter is ever going to make a difference.

Some of what they have to say if listened to with an exploratory ear and then matched to symptoms and experience does inform and inspire.
I guess that your clicking is from tightened tendons (?)- I had lots of clicking in my right shoulder after I got it back moving ( it was frozen at one point ) I think that clicking is reducing. I think the challenge I have with getting my right hand into use is from the aggregate of all the dysfunctions from my spine downwards combining so by stretching my arm out and attempting to hold it and doing that with my fingers as extended as I can manage to start with.
I hope that that is re extending the muscles and tendons and I guess nerves and I guess that’s where the tingles have come from although I can’t separate out the mechanical causes from the possible neurological or medicinal causes. I know that my doctor- local GP -can speculate with more base knowledge but he can speculate with a lot less actual experience of what living with it shows/reveals.

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