Hoping someone might recognise these problems

Hi everyone

My name is Sharon, I will try to keep the story short. My dad suffered mini strokes in 2016 which presented with extreme and unusual behaviours, the disgnosis came quiet late after he spent some weeks rehabilitating in a mental health unit. There have been many patterns of behaviour that have occured in cycles frequently in the few years since which have been decreasing slightly, last year we managed almost a whole year with no problems. I was wondering if anybody out there has had any similar experiences and if so has anyone managed to find any answers to why this happens and if there is any help to manage it? I would really appreciate any help or advise as both my sister and I worry very much and also it has a huge impact on our family in particular mum who has to deal with this first hand. Thank you so much for taking time reading my story.

Dear Sharon, I have 'comorbities' which affected my stay in hospital after my stroke. Without medication I have psychoses the lead up to which cause some pretty bizarre behaviour. I take a cocktail of drugs which work for me. Do you want to describe some of your dad's behaviour?

Best wishes Hilary

Dear Hilary

Thank you for your message, ok I had to look that up as not heard of that term before, it is very interesting as this couldv'e explained my dads situation at the start of this long road! My dad's behaviour now is much less unusual than it used to be and we can see patterns of when things are starting to change, which can be quiet quick. He will get very tired and dosnt seem to be able to concentrate, he will start to talk about stuations in his past, he can get very agitated and angry or overly talkative, or completley opposite and not want to engage in conversation at all. He can either be completely de motivated or try doing many things very fast. Doctors have been very quick in the past to diagnose depression, which can never be ruled out and in the past having taken medication for this has made symptoms worse. We call these episodes blips, but we never seem to be able to find help other than the original memory clinics and such like that he had after the mini strokes. When he was first unwell he had hallucinations, psychosis, hearing things and thinking he was being spied on, he had three collapses which he ended up being looked after in a mental health clinic during which he was then diagnosed with mini strokes.Thank you for taking time to help its appreciated and hope you are doing well yourself.

Kind regards

Sharon

Dear Sharon

I've never heard of a diagnosis of mini strokes for the behaviour you describe. I was diagnosed with bipolar affective disorder and put on medication. When they took me off medication I had psychoses again so I've opted for the lowest therapeutic dose of olanzopene, an antipsychotic. All the best, Hilary

PS I can't spell a lot of the words in mental health! You might try a group called clic which is for people with mental health problems. I am on it.

Dear Hilary

Thank you so much for your advise, we are going to look into clic anything to find some answers.All the very best wishes to you also.

Kind regards

Sharon Gillard

Dear Sharon. I have asked on clic if anyone has had the symptoms you describe but no answers yet. You can also try Mind and Rethink. Best wishes Hilary

Behaviour changes are not uncommon after stroke, it is possible that after the strokes that some deeper damage has been caused. Transient iscemic attacks are what some people call mini strokes. The survivor can recover almost completely relatively quickly, though stroke can be complicated and is different for everyone. An associated neurological condition called Charles Bonnet syndrome might be worth investigating. I have not experienced it myself but it can lead to visual hallucinations amongst other things.

It will be confusing for him.I didn't suffer a great deal of change cognitively, but my family did observe some oddities in behaviour in the early days post stroke. After 5 years things have settled down a lot and I have much more stamina and concentration for conversation and general social interaction, limited though it is right now. Stroke is a brain injury and even with the Tia it is a big thing for the brain to adjust to.

 Things improve 

 Best wishes 

TONY 

Dear Tony

Thank you for the information and glad to hear things have improved so much for you! I will certainly look up that syndrome and see if it is a possibility. If I may ask, you said your family noticed a few oddities in your behaviour after your stroke, were you aware at the time when you were going through it or no idea?, I certainly dont think my dad is aware. Many thanks again.

Best wishes

Sharon

I wasn't really aware 

 Concentration was difficult and apparently I repeat myself more than usual. It was mainly in social interaction. And I am fortunate to have a loving family to get me through it. I did get prickly when people pointed things out. I also suffered some determination in my hearing. Which didn't help with social interaction. I was told it was just coincident with the stroke but I am not sure. Hearing aids made a huge difference. Finally many stroke survivors suffi from vpost stroke fatigue. It is really common and many contributors to this forum have written about it. Conversation can be a fatigue trigger and many of us will just zone out of a conversation when fatigue hits.

 I still get episodes even 5 years in but not so intense and I am used to managing it now. My main frustrations are physical I lost the use of my left arm and hand an my left leg is still very weak. But theres a big emotional toll taken by the stroke and all in all a huge amount for an injured brain to cope with. It needs lots of quiet and rest

I am a long way from "normal" or "recovered" but have adapted and am able to get on with life mostly how I want accepting now thatcthere are things I can no longer do on my own and may never be able to. Thats a hard road to go down, with an injured brain!

I hope some of that helps. It is hard for loved ones to understand whats going on, and pretty tough often for the survivor to articulate it. That was my experience 

 Best wishes 

TONY